King of the Forest


Lucinda Marcoux, author of the memoir “King of the Forest” on
Haverhill Community Television’s “Write Now” hosted by Gayle C. Heney. 1/10/2011
© 2011 Gayle C. Heney.

Reviews about: King of the Forest
ISBN: 978-9821983-0-8 Copyright© 2009 by Lucinda Marcoux















“In the end, all illness is personal, is memoir or biography. A patient is not a just a diagnosis, but a living and breathing narrative that weaves in brothers and sisters, parents and children. And Lucinda Marcoux does a compelling job of telling the tale of the life she shared with her late brother.”
Dana Jennings, author of “Sing Me Back Home: Love, Death and Country Music” and four other books

“King of the Forest seduces the reader. A new young literary voice emerges in these pages with a compelling tale. It is a love story. In a literary world weary of dysfunctional families, Lucinda Marcoux gives us a family where love transcends the sadness of loss, where bonds between brother and sister become the instruments that heal even as medicine fails. What a wonder of writing when the reader is at once filled with tears and joy! This is a story that causes us to look anew at our own lives and losses and to find meanings that we have missed.”
Jeffrey Colman Salloway, Ph.D.,Department of Health Management and Policy at University of New Hampshire

“King of the Forest is a powerfully moving story, which is based on the author’s actual relationship with her brother; and because it is based on a true story, it is rich in authenticity. I am impressed by what an achievement it is, and I am impressed by how the skillful mingling of style and content is sustained throughout to arrive at an unforgettable coda.”
Charles Terry, former Chair of the Department of English, Phillips Exeter Academy

From King of the Forest:

“Ba bang, ba bang, ba bang…like a race horse slowing his gallop, Teddy began to slow down. Ba bang, ba bang…he made one deliberate blow after another, dropping his arms after each. Ba—he hit the bag with the full force of his right arm. Bang—he hit the bag with the full force of his left arm. The bag, set free, swung back and forth and all that could be heard was the squeaking of the metal hook. Teddy’s face was tomato red. Sweat covered his forehead and his arms swung to his sides, “Your turn.” I helped him untie the laces and pulled off his gloves.”

This book has been published with donations from Wheelabrator Technologies in memory of Ted Clark, former Director Environmental, Health and Safety Manager at Wheelabrator Concord and Wheelabrator Claremont.

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